Vulnerability assesment (risk, resilience, adaptive capacity across social-economic-environmental issues)

Useful particularly for local authority partners who are trying to incorporate climate assessment into EIA/SEA processes – the links are to various country guidelines on this issue.

http://www.iaia.org/IAIA-Climate-Symposium-DC/background-material.aspx



Framework for Adaptation: Implications for the Government

The paper focuses on climate adaptation in the UK. It provides a framework for analysing the role of Government in helping people and businesses adapt to projected changes in climate. The paper provides an analysis of market and other barriers to adaptation by theme, while presenting some options to address those barriers.

Adapting to Climate Change: Analysing the Role of Government, Fererica Cimato and Michael Mullan, Defra Evidence and Analysis Series, Paper 1, Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs, UK, 2010 [645 KB, PDF]

http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climate/documents/analysing-role-government.pdf

Participatory Scenario Development for Climate Adaptation

The paper provides discussion on the benefits and challenges of stakeholders’ involvement in developing scenarios – referred to as

participatory scenario development (PSD). Based on the experiences of a case study in Lake Balaton, it argues that the PSD provides

opportunities to integrate development priorities and plans with adaptation needs to address climate change and climate variability.

Participatory Scenario Development for Climate Change Adaptation, Livia Bizikova, Thea Dickinson, and László Pintér, Vol. 60, Number 1, pp. 167-172, December 2009 [102 KB, PDF]

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/iiedpla/pla/2009/00000060/00000001/art00017

Adaptive Governance and Climate Change (NOT FREE)

This book argues that we need to take a new tack – moving away from reliance on centralized, top-down climate approaches. It shows how adaptive governance fosters the necessary diversity and innovation for climate adaptation. The book focuses on the real-life climate issues faced by Barrow, Alaska – and analyzes how the policies developed to address those issues could be adopted by other communities.

Adaptive Governance and Climate Change, Ronald D. Brunner and Amanda H. Lynch, AMS Books, pp. 424, 2010 [payment of $35 required]

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/presssite/metadata.epl?isbn=9781878220974

1. Documentary: Assessment of the resilience of coastal communities in Maine and Oregon

2. Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Organisms and Ecosystems

3. Climate Change Information for Effective Adaptation: A Practitioner´s Manual

4. Are there Social Limits to Adaptation to Climate Change?

5. The Human Dimension of Climate Adaptation: The Importance of Local and Institutional Issues

6. http://www.utrechtlawreview.org/publish/articles/000098/article.pdf

7. Forecasting Local Climate for Policy Analysis – A Pilot Application for Ethiopia

1. Documentary: Assessment of the resilience of coastal communities in Maine and Oregon

A five-part documentary and reports that summarize the results of the project for Maine. This NOAA-funded research project is being conducted to assess the resilience of coastal communities in Maine and Oregon. The goal of the project is to move behaviour toward decisive action that results in coastal communities becoming more resilient to climate variability at all scales.

2. Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Organisms and Ecosystems“, published in the journal “Current Biology

The review entitled “Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Organisms and Ecosystems”, published in the journal “Current Biology”, describes present-day climate change, setting it in context with historical change, considers consequences of climate change for marine biological processes now and into the future, and discusses contributions that marine systems could play in mitigating the impacts of global climate change.

 

3. Climate Change Information for Effective Adaptation: A Practitioner´s Manual

The manual explicitly addresses non-climate science experts and provides guidance on the following frequently asked questions:

· What sources of information on climate change exist as a basis for decision making?

· How reliable is this information?

· What are sources of uncertainty regarding this information?

· How can we communicate relevant information to others in a credible way?

The manual is one result of a strategic partnership between PIK and GTZ that aims at bridging the gap between climate science and development practice.

 

4. Are there Social Limits to Adaptation to Climate Change?

This paper argues that when analysing limits to adaptation we need to go beyond biological, economic or technological factors. It recommends giving more attention to the role of ethics, knowledge, risk and culture in societies, as these also define limits to adaptation.

 

5. The Human Dimension of Climate Adaptation: The Importance of Local and Institutional Issues

This is an important outcome of the Swedish Commission on Climate Change and Development. It makes recommendations for and beyond the UN Climate Change Negotiations (COP15) including the need to make social protection a standard feature when building adaptive capacity of the most vulnerable households and individuals. Click on link above to download.

6. http://www.utrechtlawreview.org/publish/articles/000098/article.pdf

7. Forecasting Local Climate for Policy Analysis – A Pilot Application for Ethiopia

The paper presents an approach to forecasting future climate at the local level using historical weather station and satellite data, as well as future projections of climate data from global climate models.

The paper describes a method that can be applied to publicly-available data for any country and for any number of climate models. It does not depend on geographic scale and can be applied at the sub-national, national, or regional levels. The paper illustrates the results for future climate for Ethiopia using future climate scenario projects by eight global climate models.

This may be a useful resource for IMCORE areas where local climate models are absent or inadequate.

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